Entries in World’s Fair Bulletin, 1903-1904

Possibly the first time I found new, primary information about Rosendo Rubi was in September, 1998, when I learned about the St. Louis World’s Fair Bulletin[RR8]. This monthly newsletter was published during the period 1899-1905. It narrated events and personalities related to the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair (formally known as the Louisiana Purchase Exposition). Using an index to articles in the Bulletin that had recently been posted online, I identified articles about the Nicaraguan pavilion and topics relevant to  Rosendo Rubi’s work. At the time, I was a graduate student at the University of Washington, in Seattle. Our library had originals of many Bulletin issues. I made copies of several of these articles. I have transcribed these articles here, including digital scans of relevant photos.

Here is a listing of the articles (titles, bulletin issue, etc.), followed by the articles and photos themselves. I preserved the text exactly as found in the articles, including misspellings of names and cities. The articles are divided into two groups, and are listed chronologically within each group.

Articles about Nicaragua

  • Nicaragua. President Zelaya Planning to Visit the World’s Fair. August, 1903. Vol. 4, No. 10, page 21. Article.
  • Nicaragua’s Pavilion. December, 1903. Vol. 5, No. 2, page 22. Article.
  • Nicaragua’s Commission. June, 1904. Vol. 5, No. 8, page 26. Article and Photo.
  • Nicaragua Pavilion Dedication. August, 1904. Vol. 5, No. 10, page 45. Photo.

Other Relevant Articles

  • These articles will be entered later.

Articles about Nicaragua

Nicaragua.

President Zelaya Planning to Visit the World’s Fair.

(August, 1903. Vol. 4, No. 10, page 21. Section: About Foreign Climes and Countries)
Senor Corea, the Nicaraguan Minister at Washington, recently returned from a visit to his country which his interest in the Nicaraguan exhibit at the World’s Fair impelled him to make. He reports that he found Senor Zelaya, the Nicaraguan President, warmly interested in the matter, so much so that he contemplated visiting this country next year and attending the Exposition.

As the Nicaraguan Congress is not to meet till August, President Zelaya, after consultation with other government officials, set apart $60,000 for the use of the Commission, and the Minister of Finance will ask the Congress for an appropriation of $150,000. Senor Corea is confident that the Congress will vote a grant equivalent to at least $100,000 in gold. The people are showing great interest in the matter, and the various departments of the government are energetically carrying out the Commission’s plans for collecting and preparing exhibits. A Nicaraguan pavilion on the World’s Fair site is proposed, but whether it shall be of mahogany and other Nicaraguan woods or a staff structure has not been decided. Senor Corea is satisfied that a handsome pavilion will be erected and that Nicaragua will have a splendid exhibit.

Nicaragua’s Pavilion.

(December, 1903. Vol. 5, No. 2, page 22)
Work on the Nicaragua National Pavilion was begun last month. The building will be 50×70 feet, and have two stories. Nicaragua’s nearest neighbors will be Belgium, Brazil, China and Cuba.

Nicaragua’s Commission.

(June, 1904. Vol. 5, No. 8, page 26)
The following organization has been announced for the Nicaragua World’s Fair Commission: Chief., Dr. Leopoldo Ramirez Mairena; Commissioner, Mr. Juan Jose Zelaya; Active Commissioner, Ingineer Alexander Bermudez; Honorary Commissioners, Consul at St. Louis, L. D. Kingsland; Consul at Mobile, Louis M. Moraguez, and Messrs. Nicolas Veloz Goiticoa, third Secretary of the Legation of Nicaragua, at Washington, and W. H. Thompson; Secretaries, Dr. Rosento Rubi and Mr. Isaac A. Manning.

Nicaraguan Pavilion, World's Fair, St. Louis, U. S. A.   Photo by Official Photographic Co. (World's Fair Bulletin. June, 1904. Vol. 5, No. 8, page 26)

Nicaraguan Pavilion, World's Fair, St. Louis, U. S. A. Photo by Official Photographic Co. (World's Fair Bulletin. June, 1904. Vol. 5, No. 8, page 26)

The ornate Nicaraguan building, on the north side of the foreign section, is rapidly nearing completion, and the announcement of the formal opening will soon be made.

Nicaragua.

Dedicates and Formally Opens Pavilion.

(August, 1904. Vol. 5, No. 10, page 44)
The pavilion of Nicaragua, which was formally opened, July 11, is a two-story square building, located north of the French pavilion. It includes all the exhibits sent by Nicaragua, this country having no sections in the exhibit palaces. Among the most interesting exhibits are 1,000 different specimens of rough and polished wood, including mahogany, rosewood, cedar, oak, and all the tropical woods; 400 samples of minerals; gold, silver, copper, emerald, rubies, onyx; some fine pieces of silk one of which, representing the Nicaraguan flag, was made by hand by the pupils of the National Girls’ College of Nicaragua.

Isaac Saavodre, of Leon, has a fine exhibit of shoes made in the American, French and English styles, all of those being made only by hand; many medicinal plants, wines, liquors, sugar, honey, inks, tobaccos, cigars, many varieties of coffee, cereals, seeds, cotton, which is a new industry in Nicaragua; 600 dried plants, stuffed birds and animals; rubber, 60 varieties of textile plants; tincture woods; and a bark of an Indian tree called tuno, which looks like skin, and with which the Indians make clothes.

On the gallery up-stairs, is a furniture section, including a bed-room in mahogany, an Indian trunk in cedar, a beautiful guitar, all made by hand, a table made with 1,000 different pieces of wood, a wardrobe in rosewood, made by J. Manuel Raudez, a violoncello, some canes, one of them being made with the vertebras of a shark, some jicaro nuts carved by Indians, some alligators and lions’ skin; saddles; a hammock made by Indians, figurating the five flags of the five Central American Republics and the United States flag; historical and law books, stamps, arms used in the army; Lebel, Moser and Remington guns; a collection of wrought tools, and a miniature gun made by hand by Carmen Caldera, of Masaya; Indian matting made in Massatope; different kinds of straw hats; medicinal and toilet soaps; flowers made with insect wisngs; Indian antiquities; school pupils’ fancy work; jewels made of cocoanut, with inlaid gold and silver, by Panfilo Parrales, of Masaya; two paintings by J. B. Cuadra, a Nicaraguan artist who never studied; some photographs representing Nicaraguan scenes, and two models of uniforms used in the army.

The front room on the second floor is a reception hall, with Nicaraguan furniture, the only exception being the piano, which comes from Chicago. A picture of General J Santos Zelaya, President of the Republic of Nicaragua, adorns the wall. The President is at the head of the Republic since the Revolution of 1893. He was at that time the leader of the Liberal party, and he is very popular now, because his many improvements throughout the country have been so much appreciated.

Distinguished guests and participants at the dedication of Nicaragua's pavilion, World's Fair, St. Louis, U. S. A. Photo by Official Photographic Co. (World's Fair Bulletin. August, 1904. Vol. 5, No. 10, page 45)

Distinguished guests and participants at the dedication of Nicaragua's pavilion, World's Fair, St. Louis, U. S. A. Photo by Official Photographic Co. (World's Fair Bulletin. August, 1904. Vol. 5, No. 10, page 45)

Other Relevant Articles

Other articles will be entered later.

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One Response to Entries in World’s Fair Bulletin, 1903-1904

  1. Pingback: Nicaragua Pavilion Photos, St. Louis Exposition « Mi estero

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